Log Cabin Socks

Log Cabin Socks half done

This week I finally did cast on and start the Log Cabin socks from “Handknit Holidays”. I dumped the idea of doing a tubular cast-on in favor of a “K2, P2” cast-on. Here’s a photo of the edge.

There really wasn’t any reason to worry about the elasticity of my cast-on edge since the yarn I’m using already had lots of it. In fact, my swatch ended up being about 1/2 inch larger than the gauge listed in the pattern. I tried to be a diligent knitter adjusted my needle size but after much trial and error found that the cables constricted the fabric so much, that when I used 3.75mm needles as recommended in the book, the circumference of the sock amazingly matched the final measurements. The picture illustrates this by showing that the “cuff” of the sock is somewhat larger than the leg.

As with many projects, this one has turned out to be quite different than expected. I had visions of a somewhat over-sized sock that would be comfortable to wear around the house or with slippers. That’s not quite how they’ve turned out. The fit is snug compared to the photo in the book. Now, I’m not saying that I don’t like the socks, they’re just not quite like I expected.

I’d also like to note that the cable design on these Log Cabin socks is very similar to another pair I knitted last year called Crossing Cables. It’s interesting how such a  similar design can be knit with different construction methods.  I think the designer of the Crossing Cables sock is much more experienced at knitting cables and actually has a more technically correct way of doing these cables.

So here’s a close-up of the yarn, Cork by Rowan. Click on the photo for an expanded photo.

Rowan Cork

Isn’t it a really odd yarn structure? Reminds me of softly spun singles that have been felted before being made into I-cord. The result is a very soft sponge-like yarn with tons of elasticity. Too bad I won’t have an opportunity to use this yarn in future projects. Rowan discontinued it last summer.

8 thoughts on “Log Cabin Socks

  1. That is such a cool-looking pattern. Well done! And I agree that the yarn is quite interesting — I couldn’t think of a good word to describe it, but I think your suggestion of I-cord is spot on. Can’t wait to see the finished version of your socks.

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  2. Great looking socks! I especially like how the cable continues down the heel.
    Interesting looking yarn as well. It brings out the pattern nicely.
    And thank you for you compliment on my pattern! It came about because I saw almost the same cable on a sweater, and I wanted to make it. I didn’t have any stitch dictionairies at the time, so I just made it up to look the way I wanted it. It was after I finished the socks that I found the pattern was in Barbara Walker’s first book of patterns.
    Have a great week and I look forward to seeing the socks finished!
    Danny

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  3. I ripped mine out – I’d got to the heel. Much too snug. I think these work better as ‘slob around the house’ socks,so I’ll either knit on 4mm needles or do the men’s sock numbers.
    I think the Cork makes the cables look beautifully sculptural. Shame Rowan have ditched it.

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  4. Ran across your blog through a google search, looking for cable charts, but just thought I’d tell you that I have seen quite a bit of Rowan Cork on ebay.

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  5. I completed one sock but got thinking about what Emma said and decided to do the second one on size 4mm needles. So far I like it better and will rip out the first one. Yes, I’m hoping they’ll be ones to wear mostly around the house.
    Cyrstal – I’ve been watching the Cork on ebay. I’d love to buy more but I need to move onto some other projects. I just got a kit from Alice Starmore this week that I’m dying to start.
    Danny – I love your pattern and have plans to knit more (someday).

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